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Full text of "The Fats and oils situation"

ilg-^ 1 - / a If- 



The 




T UATION 



BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



FOS - I Oil 




NOVEMBER 1945 



EXPORTS OF LARD FROM THE UNITED STATES. 1910-45 




1925 



1930 



1940 



1945 



1945 PARTLY FORECAST 



U. S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 



NEG.4S034 



BUREAU OP AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



Exports of lard in 191^5 (including Army procurement for European relief) probably 
will total 600 to 650 million pounds, compared with 886rillion pounds in 1914 and 736 
million pounds in 1943. In the next year or two, exports of lard probably will be 
smaller than in the war years, but materially larger than in the years fron 1935 to 1940. 
In that period, drought curtailed production, and war in Europe restricted markets. 
Chief non-European outlets for lard are Cuba and Mexica. 



NOV-.i-BUt 194S 



- 2 - 



T&bl0 1.- Vi'holesBlo pric« per pound of fats, oils, and i^lycerln at specified markets, and Index 
numbers of prices of fats and oils, October 1943 and 1944, August-October 194S 



PRICES 



I tarn 



1 October 




1945 




> 1943 


1S44 


AUtJUSt 


1 Septe:Tioeri 


October 


1 Cants 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


1 41.8 


41.5 


41.5 


41.5 


41.5 


I 42. S 


42.2 


42.2 


42.2 


42. Z 


t 19.0 


19.0 


19.0 


19.0 


19.0 


I 17.0 


17.0 


17.0 


17.0 


17.0 


1 12. B 


12.8 


12.8 


12.8 


12.8 


1 13. S 


13.8 


13.8 


13.8 


13.8 


I 15.6 


16.6 


15.6 


16.6 


15.6 


1 13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


13. C 


1 10.6 


10.5 


10.5 


10. 6 


1C.5 


I 9.9 


9.9 


9.9 


9.9 


9.9 


I 12.8 


12. e 


12.8 


12.8 


12.6 


1 16.2 


16.5 


16.6 


16.6 


16.6 


. 12.8 


12.6 


12.8 


12.6 


12.8 


I 14.0 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


■ 13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


1 16.3 


16.5 


16.5 


16.5 


16.5 


1 11.8 


11. e 


11.8 


11.8 


11.8 


1 l&.O 


16.2 


IS., 


15.4 


16.4 


1 14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


1 --- 


11.1 


11.1 


11.1 


11.1 


1 11.0 


11.0 


11.0 


11.0 


11.0 


1 11.8 


11.8 


11.8 


11.8 


11.8 


t 62.7 


60.7 


60.7 


60.7 


60.7 


1 11.4 


11.4 


11.4 


11.4 


U.4 


1 2/11.5 


2/11.5 


11.6 


11.6 


11.6 


1 8.4 


8.4 


8.4 


8.4 


8.4 


1 8.8 


8.8 


8.8 


8.8 


8.8 


1 8.9 


8.7 


8.9 


8.9 


8.9 


1 8.9 


8.6 


8.9 


8.9 


8.9 


1 12.3 


12.3 


12.3 


12.3 


12.3 


1 3.6 


3.6 


3.6 


S.6 


3.6 


1 14.5 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


14.3 


1 16.3 


15.1 


15.1 


16.1 


15.1 


■ 26.2 


20.3 


24.8 


24.8 


24.8 


1 39.0 


39.0 


59.0 


39.0 


3S.0 


I 13.8 


13.8 


13.8 


13.8 


13.8 


1 13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


13.0 


I 17.7 


17.7 


17.9 


17.8 


17.8 


1 36.5 


30.6 


33.2 


33.2 


35.4 


I 12.0 


11.6 


11.5 


11.5 


11.7 


I S/11.5 


10.0 


11.1 


U.3 


11.5 



Butter, 92-9core, Chicago 

Butter, 92-8core, New York 

Oleomargarine, dom. veg., Chloago 

Shortening oontalnlng Knimal fat, 1-pound cartons, Chicat^o 

Lard, loose, Chica(,o 

Lard, prime steam, tierces, Chicago 

Lard, refined, 1-pound cartons, Chicago 

Oleo oil, extra, tierces, Chicago 

Oleostearlne. bbl., N. Y 

Talloti, eolole, Chicago 



Corn oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills 

Corn oil, edible, returnable drums, l.c.l., N. Y. ... 

Cottonseed oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. S.E. mills 

Cottonseed oil, p.s.y., tank cars, N. Y 

Peanut oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. mills 

Peanut oil, refined, edible (white), dr>»ne , N. Y. ... 

Soybean oil, crude, tank cars, midwestern mills 

Soybean oil, edible, drums, l.o.l., N. Y 

Sunflower oil, semi-refined, tank ears, f.o.b. N. Y. 



Babassu oil, tanks, N. Y. • 

Coconut oil, Daaile, crude, e.i.f. Pacific Coast 1/ 

Coconut oil, Ceylon, crude, bulk, N. Y. 1/ 

Olive oil, California, edible, drums, N. T 

Palm oil, Congo, crude, bulk, N. Y. \J 

Rape oil, refined, denatured, bulk. New Orleans .... 



Tallow, No. 1, Inedible, Chicago 

Crease, A nhite, Chicago 

*1enhaden oil, crude, tanks, f.o.b. Baltimore .*• 

Sardine oil, crude, tanks. Pacific Coast 

Whale oil, refined, bleached winter, drums, H. Y 

Cottonseed oil foots, raw, (60^ T.F.A.) dellversd, fast 



Linseed oil, raw, tank cars, Minneapolis 

Linseed oil, raw, returnable drums, carlots, N. 

Oitlclca oil, drums, f.o.b. N. Y 

Tung oil, returnable drums, carlots, N. Y 

Castor oil, No. 3, bbl., N. Y 

Castor oil. No. 1, tanks, N. Y 

Castor oil, dehydrated, tanks, N. Y. . 
Cod-liTor oil, med. U.S. P., bbl., N. Y 
Cod oil, Newfoundland, drums, N. Y. .. 

Glycerin, Soaplye, basis 80^, tanks, N. Y i ^11.5 



INUEa NUKBSIS (1924-29 = 100} 



Eight domestic fats and oils (1910-14 - 100) 
Sizht domestic fats and oils 



All fats and oils (27 items) .... 
Grouped by origin ; 

Animal fata 

Uarine animal oils 

Vegetable oils, dODSstlo 

Vegetable oils, forei^ 

Grouped by use i 

Butter « 

Butter, seasonally adjusted ... 

Urd 

Other food fata 

All food fats 

Soap fats 

Drying oils 

Miscellaneous oils 

All Industrial fata and oils 



142 

101 



106 



142 

101 



108 



142 

ICl 



108 



142 
101 



108 



142 
101 



108 



96 


96 


96 


96 


06 


132 


130 


131 


131 


132 


132 


134 


134 


134 


134 


157 


156 


156 


156 


156 


93 


93 


93 


93 


93 


90 


90 


96 


92 


90 


105 


105 


105 


105 


105 


139 


141 


141 


141 


141 


103 


103 


103 


103 


103 


120 


120 


120 


120 


120 


150 


149 


140 


148 


14S 


117 


116 


115 


115 


116 


132 


131 


131 


131 


131 



Pricea compilad from Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, Tho National Provlaionor, The Journal of Coranerce {uew YorV) ," VnV" 
reports oi" Production and .Marketing Administration and Bureau of Labor Statistics. SUcise taxes and duties induced 
where applicaole. Index numbers of earlier years beginning ISIO are given la Technical Bulletin Nj. 7^7 (lS4u) ano 
The Fats and Oils Situation beginning DecembT 1940. 
1/ Three-cent processing tax added to price as originally quoted. Zj C.i.f. New York. 3/ Drums or tanks. 



^0S-104 



- "^ - 



T E-.Z, F A T ,S ,A IT D I L § __S.I_T^U::A T I II 



Contents 



Prg:e 



Summar:/- -3 

O-.it look 5 

Recent Developr.ent s '■ 

Governnent Act ions 



SUT*IARY 

Supplies of food fats for civilian constunption in the United St?tes 
in 19^6 may a.verage 44 to 45 pounds per capita, conppred v;ith Ul to h2 
pounds in IS'^S. pi^- average of hS pounds in 1936-39. ^-^-d. a potential demp-nd 
at the 19^5 level of prices of at least 50 pounds per capita. At present 
ceilings^ the most pronounced shortage in food fat supplies in 19^6 will be 
in 'butter. Most of the incre? se in supplies in 19^6 v.dll he due to a rise 
in output of lard, hut ? moderfte exprnsion in butter production and declines 
in exports of hutter, mrrgarine, end vegetable oils ?lso Pre likely. 

Production of edible ve,p:etable oils from domestic oilseeds in 19^6 
may be slightly less than in 19^5- Cottonseed oil production vili be 
unusuflly sm?ll in the first hplf of I9-+6, because of the small 19^5 crop 
of cottonseed. But in the second h?lf of 19^6 output of cottonseed oil 
probrbly will be m?teriF,lly Iprger than a, ye?r earlier, as an increase in 
cotton p.crepge in 1^:U6 seems likely. Output of soybern oil in 19^6 mpy be 
slightly less thpn in 19^5- Some increase in pepnut oil production is 
expected. 



N0^rE^3ER-19U5 - U - 

So?p f?ts protPbly vdll "b- in somewhf*t l?rger supply in I'^hG than in 
19^5. PS ? result of mpder?,te_ increases in grease production pnd in imports 
of copr?. A larger supply of drying oils ?lso vrill "be Puvpilptle, reflecting 
the increase in the domestic crop of flaxseed in 19^5. f'^cL a protahle increase 
in imports of Argentine fla^xsefid. and resumption of imports of Chinese tung 
oil in I9U6. National income.,, .though less than in 19^5.: will 'be unusiially 
high next year. Consumer demand for f?t-and-oil products vrill he strong. 
In addition, there will he a strong demand for rebuilding inventories of 
industrial fats and oils. Stocks of inedible tallov;, grease, fish oils, linseed 
oil, pnd tung oil are now at exceptionr lly low levels in relation to probable 



use. 



Returns to flaxseed producers for the 19^6 crop will be supported at 
an average of iji.GO per bushel, Minneapolis basis, according to a recent ■ 
announcement.- This would be equivalent to an ayerage of about S3.U0 per bushel, 
farm bp.sis. Monthly average .prices to farmers for, the 19^5 crop, from July 
through October,- vrere $2.89 pei" bushel. In addition, flaxseed farmers were 
eligible this year for special payments of $5 '00 per planted acre — equivalent 
t.o -58 cents per bushel on the basis of the national average yield per planted 
acre. ■ ■ 

Subsidies to butter manufacturers vrere vrithdravm on October 3!' This 
v/as accompanied by an increase of 5 cent's per po\ind, effective November. 1, 
in wholesale price ceilings on butter, except butter in stora.ge on vrhich the 
subsidy ha.d already bscjn paid. Butter prices advanced in November, reflecting 
the nevr ceilings. This "■fas the first considerable incre.-se since 19^+2 in the 
price of any leading fat or oil. Prices of other fats and oils remain at 
ceilings. 

— November I5, 19^5 



FOS-lOU _ 5 _ 

OUTLOOK 

Lard Production, Domestic Consumption 

to Increase in 19^6 ■ "" • ■ ■■ 

•Production of l?rd and -rendered- pork fat" in l^^G. is tentatively fore-' 
cast at 2.k tillion pounds, 3*^ million po\inds more than estimr-ted output 
in 19^5. ^■'it 800 million pounds less than the record production of 3-2 "billion 
pounds in 19^4. Hogs from the 19^5 spring pig crop are "being mrrketed Ifter 
and at heavier weights than usuatl. This -may result in a 'larger hog slaughter 
in the first k months of I9U6 than a year earlier.' The -yi-eld -of -Iprd per hog 
slaughtered also is likely to te largejr thsji in early 19^5i' when export require- 
ments for fat pork cuts were unusua.lly he?vy. In May-September 19^6, hog 
slaughter will be lai'ger than a "year earlier, reflecting an increase in the 
number of ^ows f arrowed in the 'lS^-*5 fall 'season. Lard output- in October - 
December next, yeex-.msty be. al., least, as large as ia 'the corresponding months 
of 19.^5- Hog-slaughter, in the .iFst 3 months of 15^6 will be chiefly from the 
19^6 spring pig crop. A spring pig crop goal of 52 million head, the sajBe 
as the number spy.ed ..in the, ., spring ,se_f .son -of 19'-'-5f -recently v/as announced by 
the Department of Agriculture. 

Lard, experts.. in .l^.iJ-G probably vdll be smaller than the total of 60O 
to G^9 million pounds in 19^5. "but vrill be materially larger than in the 
years just before the war. From 1935 ^0 ^9^0, lard exports from the United 
States were severely curtailed, as a result of droughts and by war in Europe. 
Annual average exports in 1935-^0 were 172 million pounds, 'compared vith 
561 million pounds in 1930-3^* ^n 19^6, with world supplies of fats and oils 
still short, there will be a strong Europea,n demand for United States lard. 

Since World War I, the principal markets for United States lard have 
been the United Kingdom, Germany, other Western European countries, and Latin 
America. For many yra.rs prior to 193^> ?■■ year of severe drought followed by 
reduced lard output, the United Kingdom took a relatively sta.ble q,uantlty ■ 
of United States lard, with shipments averaging 262 million pounds Bnnually" 
in I93O-3U. In 19U2-'4U, exports of lard to the United Kingdom averaged- 
^61 million pounds annually, but this quantity probably will be substantially 
reduced in the next fevr years. Contin'-ntal Europe, chiefly Germany, was the 
largest importer of United States lard in the early and middle 1920's, but 
in 1939-3^ imports declined to -an average of only 182 million pounds. In 
19^6, the countries of vrestern Eiirope will take at least as much as inl9^5 — 
150 to' 200 million pounds. Exports to Latin American countries in 19U2-Ui+ 
averaged. 99 million pounds annually, compared with 110 million pounds in 
1930-3*+' This market probably vrill continue to ^ake about 100 millioh pounds 
a year. Around "^5 million pounds of laxd are shipped, annually to the territorial 
possessions of the United States. 

A large Quantity of lard was shipped under lend-lease to the Soviet 
.Union during the war, vdth a peak of 29U million pounds in I9UU. But it does 
not seem probable that the Soviet Union will be a major market for United 
Statr-s lard after immediate relief needs are met. 



MOVEiiBER 1945 



- 6 - 



Table 2.- Lard: Exports to specified countries, and shipments to 
•••i.--' United States territories, 1930-34 and 1942-45 



Destination \ 


Averarel 
1930-34: 


1942 ; 


1943 : 

• 


1944 : 

• 


■January- 
Aupijst 1945 


Exports: ; 
United Kingdom . . . : 
Germanv : 


iiil.lb. 

261.5 
U2.1 

: . 69.6 
■., 1/.- 
'117.9 

561.1 

• 23.0 

584.1 


Mil. lb. 
435.1 

.5 

. 83.2 - 
77.8 


Liil.lb. 
504.4 

.8 
155.5 

75.6 

736.4 
38.9 
775.3 


Mil. lb. 
393.9 

10.1 
293.9 

160.9 
858.8 

35.6 
894.4 


'lil. lb. 
146.0 


• Continental Europe: 

excludinf Germany: 

and the Soviet Union 

Soviet Unioh . . '; .', : 

Other couhtriss- . . : 


135.1 

105.2 

57.6 


Total : 


651.6 
32.8 
634. 4 . 


443.9 


Shipments to U.S.- 
territories. .... ...: 


21.2 


Total exports and : 
shipments . « .• 


465.1 



' Compiled from official records of the Bureau of the Ceiisus, except that 
shipments to territories include quantities shipned under special orograms 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, reported by USDA. Totals ccmputed from 
unrounded numbers, l/ Less than 50,000 pounds. 

Assuming exports of 500 to 600 million pounds of lard in 1946 and use 
of 55 million pounds in margarine and shortening (the average of recent years), 
the balance available for total civilian and military use as lard would be 
1,800 to 1,850 million pounds. This would be about, 13 pounds per capita, com- 
pared -vvith an estimated domestic consumption of 11.7 pounds per capita in 194 5» 
and a long-time average (except the drou^t period) of 13 to 14 pounds per capita 

Slight Decrease Likely in Production 
of Edible Vegetable Oils in 1946 

Total production of edible vegetable oils-from domestic oilseeds in 
1946 may be slightly less tten in 1945. Output of cottonseed oil in the 
first half of 1946 vd.ll be materially smaller than a .■'/ear earlier, as a 
result of the reduced 1945 crop of cottonseed. However, if cotton acreage 
were increased in 1946 to a level npar that in the years just before the 
Yra.r, cottonseed oil production in the latter half of 1946 vD'old be sub- 
stantially larger than the unusually low output in the corresponding period 
of 1945. The total for the ;'/'Bar may be slightly smaller than the total in 1945, 

Production of soybean oil in 194 6 may be s lastly analler than in 1945. 
With a slight reduction indicated in the 194 5 croo of soybeans and with a 
strong export demand for soybeans, crushings in Janu'^ry-Sept ember 1946 are 
likely to be a little smaller than a TOar earlier. Also, a reduction in 
soybean acreage is probably in 1946 as a result of shifts to hay and pastijre. 
This would mean a slightly smaller soybean-oil output in October-December 1946 
than in October-December 1945. Cruchlngs of peanuts and production of peanut 
oil in 1946 probably will be somewhat greater than a ■'/ear earlier, as a result 
of an increase in the 1945 crop of peanuts and a reduction in military require- 
ments for shelled peanut products. 



FOS-lOU - 7 - 

Batter Prod-get ion , Donest ic Consiijnpt ion 
Up Moderptely in I9U6 

Butter production is r>:pected to "be slightly larger in 19^6 than 
the 1,720 million poionds est im? ted for 19^5. '-'ith the increase coming in the 
season of flush prodiaction and l?ter. Production is. likely to remain "below the 
level of a year earlier during the first 3 months of 19^,6, unless "butter prices 
rise ahoye present levels. Ejroorts of hutter in l*^' 4-6, including shipments to 
United States territories, are expected to return to the prewar level of ehout 
IC m.illion pounds. In l'"^'+5i ?rourd 30 million pounds of "butter have "been 
exported, vdth approximately 25 million pounds (including "nutter oil and Carter^ 
spread) going under lend-lease to the Russian Army. Domestic supplies of "buttei 
■ in 19^6 may "be moderately larger than in 19^5- Also, reduced militarj' pro- 
-curement vdll add to civilian supplies per caopita. Military takings of "butter 
during the v/ar were aore than twice as Irrge, on a per capita "basis, as civiliar 
supplies. The civilian supply per ca-pita in 19^-6 vrill still "be materially less 
than prcvrar. 

Civilian Supply of Food Fats to Increase in 
1946 But Likely to Remain Short of Demand 

: ,,. ...Present propects for I9U6 indicate a civilian supply of 44 to 45 ' 
pounds, of food fats and oils per ca.pita, including "butter in terms of actual 
weight. This is compara"ble with an estimate of ^1 to ^2 pounds per capita 
in 19^5 ^^^ ? 1935-39 average of hS pounds per capita. With national income 
expected to "be at a high level in 19^6, cons-imer demand for food fats and oils 
pro"b8'bly will "br strong enough' to siipport a consumption of at least 50 pounds 
per capita., with prices at present levels. This demand vdll keep prices of 
food fats and oils at ceiling levels in 19^6. If ceilings are raised or 
removed, prices of food fats will advance. ¥ith a continuation of p-resent 
prices, the gap "between demand and supply pro"br"bly vrill "be narrovrer after nid- 
,19-+6 than in the first part of the year, principally hecausc of increased 
output of cottonseed oil and "butter in relstlon to corresponding months of 19-5' 

Soap Fat Situation To Improve in 1^'hS 

Supplies of soap fats pro"bF"'Dly will increase in 19^6. With hog 
slaughter expected to "be larger than in 19^6, output of grease is likely to 
increa.se moderately. Also, fairly s^ibstantial im.ports of Philippine copra 
■ Sire expected in 19M-6. However, imports of coconut oil and copra from Ceylon 
and the South Sea islands, .whic'n approached 200 million .pounds annually (in 
terms, of oil) in 19!^^ and' I9U5, will "be severely ciartailed in 194-6. Total 
imports of coconut oil and copra (in t~rms of oil) pro"bal-'ly will "be less than 
half as large as" the I937-U1 average of 7OO million pounds. 

Military procurement of soap fats will "bo suhst-'ntially rLduced in I9U6. 
For 194-5 as a whole, military takings of soap will total around 3OG million 
pounds in terras of fat (preliminary) out of a total soap production for all 
purposes of a"bout 2,100 million pounds, in terns of fat content. 

Demand for soap fats vrill "be strengthened dviring I9U6 "by the need to 
re"build inventories of inedi"ble tallow, grease, and fish oils. These inven- 
tories a.re now materially "belovr normal. 



F0VEi'4BSR 1945- - S - 

Increase in Supplies of Drying Oils in 19^6 ""T'"^~7.~~" 

Dependent on Imports 

.;• "',,::,.,. .Supplies of linseed oil continue short of demand at ceiling prices, 
despite peak-season crushing of the relatively lar^re 19^5 domestic crop of 
flaxseed. Ma^y Eastern seaboard mills, which depend largely on Argentine 
flaxseed, were clpsed from midsummer until recently. Hov^;ever, recent receipts 
at these jnills of some domestic and Argentine flaocseed have permitted re- 
sumption; of curshing on a limited scale. ..; / 

Relief of the tightness in linp.eed-oil supplies will depend on arrival 
of Argentine fl?xsf-ed in volume. The I9U5-U6 Argentine crop, to he hprvested 
beginning in December, is expected to be smaller than average but' substantially 
Irrger bhan the I9UU-U5 crop. However, European demaitl f or Argentine flaxseed 
is strong. United St?tes supplies of drying oils in 19^6 will be increased 
by resumption of imports of tung oil from China. 

Reduction in military requiremrnts for drying-oil products has already 
permitted a substantial increase in use of such oils in civilian products 
from the unusually lov level of mid-19'+5« 

c 

Stocks of drying oils on September 1 vrere et an except iona.lly low level. 
Demand for oil to rebuild inventories vrill be an import?nt part of the. total 
demand for drying, oils in 19^6. 

Returns per Bushel for 19^6 Flaxseed 
To Be Supported Pt $3.60 
Minneapolis Basis 

It wf s announced on lIovf"^be^ 8 thp,t returns to growers for, flaxseed 
harvested in 19^6 will be supported, by acreage payments or otherwise, at 
an average level eauivalcnt to $3.60 per bushel, Minneapolis basis. This 
would mean a nr-tional season average return to farmers in 19'+^-^7 '''f about 
$3-'+0 per bushel (farm brsis), compared with an average, price- of $2.89 P^r 
bushel in July-October 19'+5. pli^s a pa.ynent of $5. 00 peT planted acre, 
equivalent to 53 C'^nts per bushel on the basis of the national average yield 
of 8.6 bushels per planted acre in 19^5- Earners who planted flaxseed in I'^k^ 
up to their farm acrea.ge goals vrere eligible for the paymeht of $5.00 'per acre. 

Planted acreage of flaxseed in the United States for ha-Tvest in 19^+5 
wa^ U.l million acres compared ''nfeh;3il million acres a year earlier. Prices 
to farmers werr approximately the same for both crops, but in 19^5 the a.d- 
ditional payment of $5-00 per acre was offered. With a hic;h average return per 
bushel guaranteed for the 19^6 crop, planted acreage is likely to be main- 
tained at a high level next season.- 

■A strong demand for linseed oil is anticipated in 19^6-U7, on the 
basis of -a high rate of : industrial. product ion and a, return of building 
activity to a relatively high level. 

.- , .-r::: i •: ..i•■^.^• 



FOS-lOU 



- 9 - 

EECMT DEVELOPI-ffilfTS 



Deterioration in Oilseed-Crop 
Prospects During Octo'ber 

Hepvy r?ins and cold weather in Texas, Oklahoma, pnd Ark?,ns?s in 
early Octo'ber reduced the late cotton crop ?nd caused some damage to peanuts 
still in the ground and to those dug "but not yet- threshed.. On the "b?sis of 
November 1 conditions, production of cottonseed this year would he 3»85S,000 
tons, assuming, the I'^UO-^U average ratio "between yields of lint rnd seed. The 
IS^'^ production' of cottonseed was' U-,,"'^'^!', 000 "t^ns." The 19^4-5 "output of pe?nuts 
picked pAd. threshcd'-is now plpced at- 2., 17^ million pounds, compared vrith 2,260 
million pounds indicated on Octo'ber l,.pnd with p 19'4U crop of 2,111 m'illion 
po-ijnds. ■-'■". 

Hprvesting of soy"be?ns, which "began in Octo'ber, revealed le'ss vell- 
fillod pods and sop Her "beans than hpd""been expected. As ? result, the 
November 1 indication for the 1'7^5 soy"bcan crop" is" 191 million "bushels, 6 
million- hushels less than indicated a month- earlier; ■ and- 2 million 'bushels 
less than the 19^^ crop. • , 

Tahle J,.- Oilseeds: Yield per acre and production, 19^3-^5 



Commodity 



Soy'bepjis 
Flpjcseed 
^Cottonseed 
Peanut s 



Yield -por acre-L/ 



Unit 



Bu. 



L"b. 



I9I+3 

12.1 
S.2 
U27 
60s 



19UU : 

IS.U 
7-7. 

670 



Indi- 
cated. 
1914-5' ' 

IS.O 

S.6 

U20 

672 



Production 



Unit 



Mil. "bu. 
It II 

rl.COOtons 
Mil. I'b. 



I9U3 



I9UI+: 



Indi- 
cated 
19^5 



193.1 192.9- 190.6 

51.9 23.5 35.6 

U,6gS U,90i .3,358 

2,185 2,lil 2,17^ 



!_/ Soy"bepns, per acre harvested for De?ns; flaxseed, per plpnted acre; cotton* 
seed, per acre in cultivption July 1; pepnuts, per acre picked and threshed. 

World Peanut Production Slightly 

Increased in 19^5 ' i ■ ' ' 

Preliminary estimptes indicate that world peanut production in 19^5 
nay "be a"bout 20.1 "billion pounds, O-U "billion pounds more thpn in l^h^ and 
1.5 "billion pounds more, than in l,935-39- -^ large part of the increase over 
194-4 is in Senegal, the le?ding pepnut-producing section of French West Africa, 
where p crop of 772 million pounds is indicated, 270 million pounds more than 
were harvested ? year rarlier. 

The i-ndicpted United States crop of 2,17^ million pounds is a"bout 60 
million pounds larger than in I9UU. 

No reports have yet "been received on production in India and China, 
"but total output in Asia is provisionally estimated at I5.O "billion pounds, 



KO^TEMBSR I9U5 



- 10 -■ 



atout the same as last year.' IritJrk'i-- French 'vfegt .^i'rlctfk , Nigeria (part of 
British Vest Africa), rnd China wpre the principal exporters of peanuts and 
peanut oil hefore the war. . -'- ' - —■ -'• .- ■ 

Tahle k.. - World .pe? nut productiqini- ••average 19-35-39, annual igUU and I9U5 



Continent ?nd country ' 



. ;. '. . Average . : 
-■:■- 1915-39 : 



19UL 



tPreliminery, 
1 19^+5 



..■Mil.- Ih. 



S3 . 



S7 



ih, 9U6 



North America .■'•' ■■"!.' ■ ■ 

.United States ♦ . . . * ..^^. . .:.'.:; ... : '1,223 

Estimrted total : 1,279 

Europe , estimated total . -^ 

Asia • ." . : 

India ..; ..: 6,591 .7,97^ 

China : 5,379_^. ] 2/2, ko6 

Estimated total : 13,636 

Africa : 

French '.'Jest Africa : 1, 752. 

Nigeria : kj 676 

Estimated total 

South Ajnerica. ; : • 

. Argentina. . . . .;.-.. . . . .; 

Estimated t'Otal . .; 

Oceania (including: A-us-ralia) 

Estimated totel 



Mil. Ih. Mil, Ih. 

■■ 2.111 1/ 2.I7U 



2,2S5 1/ 2,360 



S7 



. N. . A. 

■ n.-.'a.- 



15,000 



-■ S^-l 1/3/ 900 

..i/ 612. J/ 616 



.3.305 : ' . 


.: .:•.. i,so9. 


1/ 2,100 


.■ '• 1^75 .f 


: U3g 


■ 3^9 


257 


5^S- 


•■ 500 



21. 



io: 



-12. 



Estim.a..ted wotiid- total .■.-. IS, 573 



19,693; 1/20,100 



Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations (Foreign Crop-s and. Mrrkets, 51:17;23Q 
Octoher 22, 19^5). ; 

1/ Revised. 2/ Free China only. ^^ Unofficial" estimate. U/ Piroduction not 
availahle; exports are shovm. 

World Flaxseed Output U£_ in I9U5 

World flaxseed production in 19^5 (including Southern Hemisphere crops 
partly harvested in I946) nay total ahout I50 million bushels, according to 
latest indications. This is 26 million "bushele more than last year and I3 
million hushels more than the 1935-39 average. TheUnitcd States crop this 
year is estimated, at 35»6 million "bushels, 12.1 million "bushele more than 
last year.. No official estimate of the Argentine oOp, to "be harvested 
"beginning... in. Cecem'ber, has yet "been made. Ahout U.6 million acres were 
planted -th.is' year, 2 percent less than in igUUj ' But unusually favora'ble 
vreather since planting time is expected to result in a substantially larger 
output this year tha.n :^.n 19H'4~U5, when yields, were severely reduced "by 
drought. Output of flaxseed in India in 19^+5 is placed, at I5.6 million 
"bushels, compared i-dth I5.2 million "bushels last year. 



FOS-lOU - 11 - 

Ta"ble 5.- World -production of flaxseed (China excluded), average 1935-39, 

■ annual ig'^ and 19 '+5 

ri J. - J. J X. J-rt-veraee • ■, n],)^ JPreliminary 

__ '^""^ ^ "^^^ ^^"^ country ^ iia3±:^_ _L^ ___ : 191 ^5 

: Mil, bu . Mil, bu . Mil, liu* 
North America - 

United States : 11.0 23.5 1/35-6 

Canada : 1-5 9.7 7.^ 

Mexico : .1 2/1.0 2/ 1.2 _ 

Estimated total ; ' 12 .7 3^.3 I/UU. 3 

Burope . excluding the Soviet Union : 

Estimated total : 9.U 10. 3 7.5 

Soviet ' Union = 3/29.5 N. ft. N. A, 

Asia 1 . ..' 

India : IS.l 15-2 15.6 

Estimated total, oicludine China ; 20.U 17. l6.2 

Africa : 

Estimated total .* ..... : ,^ J ^ 

South Ans rica 5 ' 

Argentina ' ...,: 59.6 31. If. A. 

Uruguay ; 3.9 l/ 3.9 H. A. 

Estimated Total' : 6U.2 1/35. 6 5^.0 

Oceania (including Australia) '• 

Estimated total : 5_2 j_2 

a 

Estimated world total, exdiluding China: 136.8 12U jO I/15O.6 

• 

Office of Foreign Agricultural Relations (Foreign CroDS and Markets, 

51:13.:17'+, Septeirber 214., ^19^+5). 

1/ Reviged. - . 

2/ Unofficial estimat e. . 

_^ Average of less than 5 years. 

GOVEEFr^iENT ACTIONS 

Celling Prices Established for Soybeans 
Produced in 19^-5 

i^aximum Price Regulation 6OO, effective November 2, established maximum 
prices for 19U5-crop soybeans at the same levels as those formerly in effect 
under IViPR 573- for soybeans ^produced in I9UU, The ceiling for producers' bulk 
sales of U. S. No. 2 green or yellow soybe.-^nR is $2.10 per bushel. Ho'^'ever, 
soybeans to bo i.xsed for plantir,,- in I9U6 and soybean^ especially cleaned for 
use in food products are exempt from price ceilin.-,-s. The support price to 
producers this sc?.son for No,'l o-r ,No. 2 green or yellow- soybeans is $2.0U 
per bushel, the same as in 19UU-U5. 

Butter Subsidy and " Roll-'Back " 

Terminated . , ' - 

The G-overnment subsidy of 5 cents per pound to butter manufacturers, 
in effect since June 1, I9U3, was. ended October 31, 19U5, On November 1, 
ceiling prices for sales of unsubsidized butter by manufacturers and whole- 
salers were raised 5 cents per pound by Amendment 39 to Revised Maximum Priae 



NOVSilBER 19U5 - 12 - 



Regulation 289. '^he new ceiling for 'mrinufi,cturers' sales of -bulk g2-score 
butter, delivered-nt Chicago, is U6.CGnts^;3£u:Twund.Rc\£7ulT,tioni5 governing 
retail' mark-ups permit incrcasAfe -jyeS^aa-ing ^ to G cents in the- retaxl; -orico 
per pound of unsubsidi'z-oci butter-.- The new retail -orice ceilings -also became 
effective Hoveraber 1, '""'Stored butter, on which -thd' subsidy had 'already -been 
paid remains subject to the old ceilings .unl-es-s' 5 "cents, pec poiaid is returned 
to the Treasury, TKe average retail prico. of- buffer in.lead.lng cities J.IV-;..-. 
recent months prior tp Hovember-was 50 cepts- per "pound, . ; 

• --These .increases in celling ^jric.es^ w.ill. a-lloV "butter. -nr-icTss- to 'rise to 
approxi-iiiately the levels prevail-ing in', i-iay. 19^3"'" ' ^^^ '^ ceilings were reduced 
in June 19'-t-3 as part Of the program to'.hold the cost of living -in 'dnock, 

.• • • -,... ' ■,.:■■, 

..... '. .:.;■ ■...•. f' - ^■- '- ■ 

Peanut Butter Subsidy Ended ; • . • . ■..-.■'-■ 

Price Ceilings Incre'p.sed ' ■' ,. ■ 



Subsidy payments by Commodity Credit Corporation to_ p.e.anu't*'butter .manu- 
facturers were ended October 31« These payments- had' Veen ^.Ti^de at- the fate' 
of ^.5 cents per pound from November 1, l^^J, to -August " 31 ^ 1^'5» and at the _. 
rate of U.O cejits -oer pbundfrom Sep.t.9inber 1,, ,19^5 "'^ci 'Cctober J,l, ISk^, Pay- 
ments had been made only on peanut -butter packed in ret.ail-size containers 
(2 pounds or less), ..■-■■" • - • ' 

»'ianuf acturers.' ceiling prices for peanut butt>:,-r packed in reta.il'-'con-' ■ 
tainers were raised h cents per pourtd on i'loveraber 1 by AiHehciment 1 to ' :•'- • ' 

Ri^iPR H-35« This action was taken t.Q-GaraGrisat e liiantLf actueres for Mithdra'^'al 
of the subsidj''. Under regulations governing ^-'holesale and retail price 
ceilings, retail -orices of peanut butter .■nay advance approximately 6 cents per ■ 
pound when the U-cent increase in -processors' ceiling is fully reflected • 
The average retail price of -peanat butter in recent m^-nths in leading cities 
of the United States was 23.6 cents per poxind. 

Shortening Subei-ly To Be Terminated 

•^t was announced in November that shortening subsidies would be terminated 
on or before December 31f 19'^5. Under the -orescnt --jrogram, - in effect since. 
mid-December l''^ 3» shortening manufacturers are eligible for ■oaj'ments from 
Commodity Credit Corporation on shortening sold, to wholea.alers, retailers, or . 
consumers and sold In'd'ums or tierces. The .rate of ■oaynientis 0.2 cent per 
pound on the .vegetable-oil content of hydrogenated shortening and i. 4. cent per 
pound on thO; v- get.able-oil content of sta-id'-rd shortening. 

Specific ^"^axxnaims Est.?.blished for • • . 

Olive Oil " Foots " 

Amendment 5I to i'laxiraum Price Regulation 53f effective "^ctober 22, 
established ST>ecific maximum prices for olive oil "foots" (sulfur olive oil) 
at 17 cents per pound. This maximum applies to domestic oil in t-\nk car's, 
f.o.b. seller's plant, -and to imported oil in tank cars, f.o.b, port, of entry. 
■^ additional cent per pound may be choxged for oil sold in drums. Olive 
oil "foots" ia an inedible oil extr-'icted from olive press cake residue by use 
of solvents, and is used mainly in soap raaiiuf acture. 



FOS-IOU - 13 - 

Set -Aside Percentage Reduced 

For Lard - . ..-.■■ _ • 

The q_uantity, of lard that federally inspected packers in 19, Spates 
are required- to set_ aside for -ourchase "oy Government agencies was reduced on 
Novemter U f rom' UperceTit'''to 3 l/2 percent of the total live weight of ^ogs 
slaughtered. This action was taken in Amendment 2k to '''ar Food Order' 75»3« 
The States in. which this, requirement is effective are. Ohio, Indiana, 'Illinois, 
Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, .lovra, llebraska, 
i\ansas, 'Missouri; Montajia, Idaho, liVoraing, Colorado, Nevada, -'evr Mexico, 
and Arizona. The set-aside is- equivalent to 20 to 25 percent of total 'output 
of federally inspected lard and rendered -pork fat. 

Use Preference for Inedible Tallow ■ . * 
and G-r ease- Beraov ed 



'War Food Order 67 ^^s. amended, effective October 1, to .revoke provisions 
. requiring priority to be given orders .for inedible tallow a^nd grease for use 

• in non-soap products. Air users may now purchase inedible^ tallovf ahd grease 

• on an equal ba.sis-, subject only, to the inventory rest.rict.io.ns .of the order, 
v/hich remains in 'force, "... 

. . . ■ » 

Restrict.ions . on Use of Rapeseed Oil ' ' ^ . ' • 

Terminated 

War Food Order '351 limiting the use of ra.peseed and musfrardseea oils ^ 
• to the n^nuf actu^e 'of wB.r loroducts', mainly marine engine lubricants, was ■;•. 
terminated l^overaber 1, ''.'ith G-ov ■^rnmett requirements for these oils sharply 
.reduced, ■ restrictions on their use'w^^re ho longer necessary. 

Correction 

Private imrjorts of edible aftd inedible 'tallows continued subject to 
■ controls 'undcr WO 63 from July 20 "to September 20, 19^5 and still are con- 
trolled, • In the October issue of The Fats. and Oils Situation (riage Ig) %t 
•was erroneously st>ated that tallow imd'been exempted from WO 63 by Amendment 3» 
effective July 20,' but restored to control by Amendment 5» effective September 
20. 



lIOVBi'iBER 1945 



Ih 



I'able 6.- Suoply and disposition of fats and oils, average 1937~'^-'-» annvial 19^2-^5 




:3il. lb. Bil. lb. 3il. lb. 3il,. lb. Bil. lb. 



Production from. doine<^tic mat erial:S : ■ 

•Butter: .Creamery ,..■ .: 1.780 I.76U I.67U 1.^87- 

•Farm.......,.,...., ^ :' .^ 31 . . 366 '. , .."^l ' . "^29 

■ Total .' 2.21 1 2. 1^0 2.01 5 I. SI6 1.720 " 

Lard and rendered pork: fat J : 

Inspected : 1.22U I.72U 2.080 2.367 

Other : ■ .7^ . jk^ .97 7 .^ 

Total ; I.9 6 H • 2 . U69 3.0S6 ' • 3 - 215 2.10 

Edible tallovf, oleostearine,oleo J 1 

stock , and oleo oil .,.,; .213 .277 .259 .I98 .220 ' 

Corn oil 4 ■.. .; ■.•■•...155 .2US .237 ,211 .220 

Cottonseed oil ; 1.1}72 I.386 I.313 I.I32 I.2U0 

• Peannt nil .'.:.;;■. ....._ : -.087 .277 .153 2/ .108 2/ .100 

"S-v'--r. -il .: .^Ij . T62- ' 1.2^U -1.2U6 "1.^20 

Inedible. talloN ana .-rcases : I.167 1.7^42 1.650 1.3^'^ 1.750 

Marine animal oils :, .243 .158 .175 .213 .210 

-Lin<^eed oil 3/ •■ .277 •699 • 71'^ • .729 .^50 

OCther : ^021 . 035 .040 - : 0ir' .OUO 

T-tal, froir. domes'&ic materials : 5,-^0 9. 93"-' 10.;4g 10. 8^^9 9.370 

S*ocks, "January 1 (crude oasis; , c.e. 2.3 '<^.0 ci.2 d,2 

Imports of oil and factory product ion : ' .,. 

of oil from imported naterials U/ ; 2.0 . 1.0 .9 1.0 jj_ _ J 

Total supply ; 12. U 13._3 13.8 iJ+.O 12. t| ^ * 

Exports . regx-Qorts and Shipments : 

To U. S. terrotories %/ ..: ,k »S ■ 1,6 1.6 1.1 

" _Stocics. December 31 (crude basis) : 2.3 ' 2.0 ; 2.2 2.2,. I.7 

Domestic disappearance : 9.7 10 . '^ 10.0 10. 2 9.6 

1-iilitary procurement,' excl. relief : .5 •9 1.1 1»1 

Estimated ci-vilian disa-opeaEance ; 9.7 ^.8 9.1 9* 1 8. 5 

: Founds Founds Founds Pounds Founds i 

Civilian disappearance, per capita '• 7^ 7^ 70 70 65 

Compiled from reports of the Bureau of the Census, i'ish and "Wildlife Sen^ice and 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. Totals computed from unrounded numbers. 

ij Partly forecast. 

2/ Total production minus oil equivalent -cf imported Argentine peanuts. 

3/ Total -production minus oil equivalent of net imports of flaxseed. 

4/ Imports include shortening and soa-o in terms of fat content. Exports include 

arargarine, shortening, and soap in terms of fat content, procurement by the Array, 

for Eijxopean relief and procurement by the American Red Cross. Exports do not 

include oil equivalent of oilseeds exported. 



KOS - 104 



Table 7.- Iirports and exports of fats, oils, oil-bearing materials, and fat-and-oil products, 
January-August, average 1938-41, 1944 and 1945 

Primary, fats 

' '■ . • - I Imports for oo nsumption a Exports l7" 

Item ; , I Average i ,0^7 : 1945 s Average : i 
. ^ ; 1936- 41 . '■^ * I 2/ . 1938-4 1 i "*^ , 

__ . ^ yil.'lD . mi. la . Mil, "lb . iiiT. lb . Mil, lb . 

Animal fats ' . . i 

— Butter : 1.1 1.7 3/ 6.4 50.8 

lard : 3/ 3/ .2 191.6 617.1 

Oleo oil ; '. ■ • •• 2.3 2.4 

Stear^ne, animal, edible : .3/ .2- .1 

Oleo stock t ; f - — 1.6 .2 

Tallow, edible i .6 18.8 1.7 .1 1.1 

Tallow, inedible : 3.9 37.6 31.6 1.0 14.6 

Creases ^ 3/ V 3/ 2.7 ' 1.9 

\'ioo\ grease > : 1.6 7^ .6 --- 

Neat's-foot oil ......' .'.....; — •- ^4 ^6 ;4 .1 

Total, animal 7.2 SB. 4 ' ' '34.9 ' ' 206.3 666.2 

Marine fat s « 

Fish- liver oils .- i 27.2 15.6 14.9 — 1.2 

fish oils , » I 1.6 8.6 •'10.2 2.1 7.4 

Marine mammal oils 14.2 l.S 1.6 . , 3/ 2.7 

Total, marine .' 43.0 25. 7 26.7 " 2.1 11.4 

VefaB taole fats I 

Babassu'oil .3 .9 2.7 

Cashew pjt shell lio.uid (oil) • i 2.0 4.2' .2 

Castor oil .1 13.6 1.1 .7 1.7 

Coconut oil ' I 242.2 37.3 30.7 24.1 4.9 

Corn oil 7.4 V i/ .1 .2 

Cottonseed oil 24.3 T..6 33.0 7.4 4.3 

Japan wax (tallow) ' '..... t 1.7 — - --- --- 

Linseed oil 1 .1 63.9 29.8 1.9 237.6 

Oiticica oil : 13.6 5.0 15.1 — 

Olive oil, edible '. ! 36.0 '' ' .2 8.'7 — .1 

Olive-oil "foots" ,. : 14.3 . ,— — ■—- • .4 

Olive oil, inedible ..' '. 3.3 ,1 .1 3/ 

Falm-kernel oil i 1.1 — ' — 

Palm oil I 180.5 39.9 53.9 12.2 4.2 

Peanut oil ........ .,:.^. ...> 3.3 3/ 2.0 .2 

Ferilla,oll '......'. i 16.2 — — — - 3/ 

Rape oil ..,"; ..V. ...... .'. i 7.1 13.0 . 11.7. ' — .2 

Sesame O'il 2.2 .9 

Soybean oil , i 1.9- • .1 • -■«-• • 7.7 33.1 

Sunflower Oil ' .1 33.2 , . S^.e 5/ 5/ 

Teaseed oil .,, i 3.2 — --- 

'lung oil ■-....... : r 59.3 .,.1.8 .2 ' " 2.9 .1 

• .Vegetable tallow ' t 1.1 3/ .2 

Other vegetaole oils and fats : T.O 1.1 £/l0.2 10.4 

Vegetable' oils, shipments to U. S. territories : — r . --- --- 6/ 6.2 5.5 

Total', vegetaole .-....' '. i 621,2 219.7 ^~?t'^. 75.5 305.0 

■ Total, primary fats. 67r.4 ■ 303.9 '3T?77 ' 283.9 1,002.5 

Oil-bearing materials (in' terms o^ oil)- 

Babassu kernels (63 percent) 37.5 4.8 33.5 

Castor beans (45 percent) i 64-7 . . 104-2 • 97..7 • . . ■ -^-' 

Copra (63 percent) '........;..........-.... t 219,1 75.2 114.0 13.8 

Cottonseeo. (15.5 percent) : --- ' ■ • • -_'- •' ' ^ - — .5 

Haxseeo (S4 percent) ! 198.7 173.0 53.2 .3 

Murumuru kernels (36 percent ) 7/ •. * ."^ •* '^ *■" 

palm-nut kernels (4b perpent) , 1 6.0 B'.8 36'.3 

Peanuts , shelleu (39 percent) t ' , — r . , . 19,6 » . . --- 

Perilla seed (37 percent) ' '. . . . i .6 -.-- ^— — - 

Sesame seeu (4'7 percent)^ , .....I 3.1. - • 3.4 2t/ --- 

Soyoeans (l.'j percent) j - — 9.9 3.6 

Tuoum kernels (43 percent) ' : 2^;4 ^7 3^9 --- 

Total, oil-bearing materials i 533.0, . ■ 370.5 . 358. & - - 23.7 4.4 

. Manufactured products; (f^t content) . . 

Margarines/ 6/ l.-2» • - '--- -'--■■ '6/ l.O' 41.8 

Shortening 6/ ,S , l/. . !•/ . . e/ 5.6 10.4 

Soap r ■" 6/ 2 Jo"' ' " '■ li .2 6/20.9 20.5 

Total, aanuf a c t ured products .^ . < 4.1 .?■ .2 27. S 72i7~ 

Grand total * 

All items 1,208.4 674.6 672,6 335.1 1.079. 6 



1945 



Mil, lb . 

4/ 29.8 

465.1 

.2 

3/ 

"{/ 
4.4 
4.3 



504.0 



3.0 

8.2 

13.0 



24.2 



.9 
.1 
.1 

7.0 

6.4 

.1 
.1 

v 

14.6 
.1 

.5 

28.4 
39.0 

1.5 

2.1 

b.O 



10b. 9 



634.1 



1.0 



38.3 



39.3 



44.9 
15.9 
37.1 



97.9 



771.3 



Compilea from Monthly Sumiary of Foreign Commerce of the United S<;ateB, records of the Bureau of the Census, and reports of 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture. -Totals computed frxMa unrounded numbers. 

The following items are not included abovei Procurement by the Army in 1S45 for European relief, 65 loillion pounds of 
lard and 6 Inillion pounos i'at content of soap. Procurement of margarine, shortening, and soap by the American Red Cross, 
in terms of fat content, 14 million pounds In 19*4 and 10 million pounds in 1945. 

1/ Induces shipments to U. S. territories of butter., lard, ana manufactured procuots; reexports of coconut, palm, ana tung 
oils, olive-oil foots, and coprai and reexports in 1944 and 1946 of certain quantities of whale oil and sunflower oil 
reported in. imports for consuitiption. Shipments Include special {)ro^pai.is of USLA in 1 j44 and 1945. 2/ Preliminary. 
3/ Less then 50,000 pounds. 4/ Includes actual weight of butter oil and spreads (Army). These were not reported separately 
prior to 1S45. i/ Not reported separately. 6/ Eight-twelfths of annual average. 7/ 1938-41, 35 percent. 8/ Imported 
margarine goes largely to Puerto Rico ana the Virgin Islands. 



is'OV&iBjS 19U5 



- 16 - 



Table g.-Fats and oils: Tot-il f-'ctory production, January-Auj^ist 19UU and I9U5, and 
factory and warehouse stocks at end of .•nonth, August I9UU, and July and Auj^st 19U5 



Items grouped by 
major use 



Production 



!Jan.-A\ig. :Jan.'^Aug, 
J i qUi^- ; iqU i^ 



st ocks (c r ude "basis) 
July 31 :Aug. 



wool grease 



• Mil, lb. 

Food fats and oils : 

Butter 1/ : 1,100.7 

Lard and rendered pork fat 8/ ,; 1,810.6 
Oleo oil, edible animal stear- : 

ine, and edible tallow : 1U 1.7 

Total edible animal fats ...: 3. 053.0 

Corn oil 3/ : 137 .3 

Cottonseed oil j/ : 513.6 

Olive oil, edible : 5.5 

Peanut oil j/ : 77.'5 

Sesame oil : I4./ 

Soybean oil j/ : 87 6.7 

Total edible vegetable oils : I.6 1 O.6 

Soap fats and oils : 

Tallow, inedible 
Grease, excludin; 

Palm oil _2/ 

Fish oil 

Marine mamraal il 

Olive oil, inedible and foots 

Total slow-lathering oils .,'> ] .212.5 

Babassu oil 3/ : U/ 

Coconut oil 3/ ,: ~S6.9 

Palra-kernel oil _3/ : 1+/ 

Total lauric-acid oils .....: ~ 

Drying; oils : 

Castor oil, dehydrated j/ I 

Linseed oil : 

*^iticica oil : 

Perilla oil : 

Tung oil : 

Total drying oils 7 

Other industrial : 

Neat's-foot oil : 

Wool grease : 

Cod oil and fidi -liver oils ...: 
Castor oil, No. 1 and IJo. 3 S/ : 

Rape oil : 

Other vegetable oils ; 

Total :' 



Aug. 31 
JL2kii 



iq^5_ 



19^5 



31 



681. 7 
U55.0 

75.7 

.1 

1/ 



55.6 
70U.6 

y 

hi 



1.5 

11.1 

6.5 
51.5 

23.2 



B2i^ 



Mil, lb. iUl. lb. Hil. lb. l-!il. lb. 



1,0U5.0 
861.6 

_ Jit3i3_ 
2 .050. 1 
ll+b.l 
712.2 

79.^ 

- 9^8 -1. 
I .g90. 3 



137.9 
609.6 

2U.'p 
772.0 

21.0 

225.5 

2.0 

kk.8 

-5-1 
2 U1.9 



ISU.g 
105.0 

19.2 



333^ 



309.0 
19.6 

351.5 

1.8 

51.8 

1.7 
232.8 

i52.2. 



617.2 
3^9.7 

66.1 

'hi 



1 .033.0 

11^.3 
it/ 



177.7 

163.7 

5U.I 

109.1 

51.7 
3.U 

559.7 



118.1 
75.0 
71.2 
60.1 
2U.8 
1.8 



J51.0. 



8 6.9 llU. -^ 



5.7 
103.5 

5/ 



11.1 
12U.li 
6/ 27 .5 6/ 29.2 



1 09.2 163 .0 



^1.5 
281.2 

y 



11.1 

32^.0 

' U.6 

.3 

2li.6 



8.U 

1U5.U 

7.7 

.1 

12.9 



60.2 322.7 363.6 17U.5 



1.6 

11.8 

U.2 
65.6 



Or and T p tal.. . ..; 6 .816.9 



1^ 



32.1 

3. 



2i 



•2.5 

3.7 
16.0 
U2.6 
15.6 

1 15.1 

2Ji5i.i. 



1.9 

2.9 

13.3 

11.9 

18.2 

U5.g 



5,5 75, 7 

Compiled from reports of the Bureau of She Census, except as noted, 
stocks held by G-overnnent in reoorted i^ositions. 



9^.0 



1.7 50.7 
Dat' 



206.5 
93.2 

15.6 
315.3 

16.5 

288.8 

1.8 

^9.1 

1.6 
222.11 
580.2 

102.0 
75.0 
68.0 
78.0 

23.3 

1.6 

3^7.9 

13.0 
137.^ 



179.6 

9.U 

151.0 

9.0 

.1 

11.9 

131. U 

2.1 

13.8 

13.5 
21.2 

1^7.0 

101.0 



1.705. U 
include 



• otals co.tnuted from unrounded 
numbers, 

1/ Creamery butter .rorluction and cold-storage stocks, U.S. Department of Agriculture. 
£^J!ederally mspedted product ion, USIk. j/ Stocks, crude oil plus refined oil con- 
verted to crude basis by dividing by the following factors: Babassu, corn, cotton- 

O.9U. 
Converted 

,, _. -__, ^ -t _.„.... ^ i^w^v. ».i u.cj.iivJ'acture of 

dehydrated castor oil excluded from i^roduction. 




FOS-loU 



17 - 



Ta'ble 9«- Price received ty fr-rmers and prices at terminal 
in?irkets for specified oil-bearing materials and oilmeals 
Octo'ber 1914-3 rnd I9UU, August-0cto"ber I9U5 

Oilseeds 



Item 



Castor "beans, Braziliaji, 

f.o."b. Brazilian ports .... 
Cottonseed, United States 

average 

Flaxseed, No. 1, Minneapolis 
Flaxseed, United States 

average 

Peanuts, No. 1 shelled, 

Spanish, Southeastern 

shipping point s 

Peanuts, United States 

average 

Soyheans, No. 2 Yellow, 

Chica go 

Soyheans, United States 

average 



Copra meal, Los Angeles ... 
Cottonseed meal, Ul percent 

'. protein, I^emphis 

Cottonseed raeal, Ul percent 

protein, Chicago 

Linseed meal, 32 percent 

protein, Minneapolis .... 
Linseed meal, ^U percent 

protein. New York 

Peanut p.eal, U5 percent 

(protein, f.o.h. South- 
eastern mills 

Soyhean raeal, ^1 percent 
protein, Chic='go 



Unit 



Long ton 

Short ton 
Bushel 

Bushel 



100 pounds 
100 pounds 

Bushel 

Bushel 

Short ton 



October 



13hk 



1945 



Aug. : Sept . : Oct. 



D ollars Dollars Dollars Do llaiB - Dollars 
75,00 61.00 82.50 S2.50 t4.50 

52.50 
2.99 

2.79 

lU.OO 
7.05 
l.SS 
l.SO 

51.50 

Us. 50 

54. U5 
U5.50 



52.70 
3.10 


52.50 
3.10 


3.10 


51.CO 
3.10 


2.90 


2.S9 


2.29 


aS9 


1U.25 


IU.25 


uu.25 


1U.25 


7.71 


S.I9 


S.29 


g.oS 


2.0U 


2. If? 


2.17 


2^1 


2.0U 


2.12 


2.07 


ao6 


Oilseed 


Meals 


1/ 





2/U9.00 2/U9.00 

53.00 53.00 
51.90 52.00 



U9.SO 2/50.00 2y%550§'iS.50 

Us. 50 Us. 75 1+^475 ^&75 

5U.75 5^-75 ^,75 
U5.50 U5.50 U5.50 
U9.00 U9.00 U9.00 



5U.U5 
U5.50 



53.00 53.00 53.00 
52.00 52.00 52.00 



Compiled from Oil, Paint and Drug Rcportf^r, Daily Market Record (Minneapolis) , 
Chicago Journal of Commerce, reports of the B-areru of Agricultural Economics, 
; ahd records of Production and Marketing Adm.ini strati on. 
1/ Bagged, carlots. 
2_/ Originpl Quotation adjusted to hagged-carlots basis. 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



3 1262 08905 2129 




* 



\